Sights to see near to the Cantinone Bed & Breakfast holiday accommodation

Jesi walls

Jesi

Jesi (pronounced 'yay-see' has always been an important industrial and artistic center with a strategic location on the floodplain on the left (north) bank of the Esino river 17 kilometres (11 mi) inland from the Adriatic Sea. The main sights include the Cathedral, Palazzo della Signoria built in 1486-1498 and the 14th Century town walls built on the line of the original Roman town walls.

The church of San Marco in the 'New Town' - outside the town walls - is in gothic style and was built in the 13th century. The Palazzo Pianetti is one of the most outstanding examples of Italian Rococo art. The wide fa├žade has exactly one hundred windows, while the interior has a noteworthy giardino all'italiana. The palace houses city's civic art gallery, with a series of paintings by the Venetian artist Lorenzo Lotto.

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Frasassi Caves

Relatively recently discovered, the Frasassi Cave system has only been open to the public since the 1970's. It was always believed there were caves in the Gola Di Rosa leading to a systematic search by speleologists and geologists began early in 1948 by the Marche Spelaologic Group of Ancona. In the period between the wars there were a few explorations and searches by prehistoric and natural science researchers, but they were sporadic in nature.

The first hint of the most relevant discovery, the one of the Big Cave of Wind, took place on September 25th 1971, when Rolando Silvestri of the Italian Alpine Club Speleological Group of Ancona discovered a small entrance through the north slope of mountain Vallemontagna.

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Fabriano

Fabriano is a name immediately recognized by two groups of people: those who love old books, and those who love Italian painting. Both claims to fame date to roughly the same period, as well: native son Gentile da Fabriano's beautiful and characteristically elaborate Gentile paintings of Christian subjects which pop up in our mailboxes every year at Christmastime; and the city where he was born was one of the earliest places in Europe to make high-quality paper on an industrial scale, which in turn was one of the factors that led to the establishment of nearby Foligno (in Umbria, 55 km SSW of Fabriano) as the earliest printing center in Italy in the late 15c. Fabriano's wealth and commitment to the fine arts in the late medieval period have left it with many handsome monuments, majestic town centre and the Museum of Paper Making and Watermarks.

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Cingoli

A windy walled town built on a hill that receives the last rays of the sun when all around is in shadow; "non e' ancor notte a Cingoli", (it's not yet night at Cingoli) goes a popular Marche saying, meaning, "don't count your chickens before they're hatched".

The place has also earned the title "the Balcony of the Marche" for its sweeping panoramas - the best views are from behind the church of San Francesco. Climb up Corso Garibaldi to Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, once the forum of Roman Cingulum and still the heart of this stone-built town. To one side stands a fine 16thC Renaissance town hall with a much earlier clock tower. Inside is the smart, newly arranged Museo Archeologico with interesting Bronze Age lumber - to see the collection call at the library (Biblioteca comunale) in Via Mazzini 1. The library also houses the town's Pinacoteca, or art gallery, with another of the region's serendipity collections of paintings by Lorenzo Lotto.

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Staffolo

Neighbour to Cupramontana, Staffolo is a well-preserved historic hiil-top town with a centre retaining it's medieval feeling. Staffolo hosts an annual International Folklore festival inviting dance groups from all over the world, and the Festival of Verdicchio in August. Like Cupramontana, Staffolo is a major Verdicchio wine producer and there are many wineries to visit both in Staffolo and in San Paolo Di Jesi, nearby.

Staffolo has enjoyed rich cultural patrimony and illustrious people were born and have lived here. Visitors can enjoy monuments, buildings and mediaeval constructions as well as intense cultural life, including the work of music academies and local artists. It is well worth visiting the Church of Saint Egidio and the Church of Saint Francis (XIII century). Among local figures we can mention notary Vagnone Manuzio (XIII century) ancestor to the well-known Manuzio family, editors in Venice and Rome between the XVI and XVII centuries; the painting artist Maestro from Staffolo (XIV century; organ players Fabio and Alessandro Costantini (XVII century); and humanist Lancellotti (XVIII)..

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Serra San Quirico

This medieval village is a good example of the region's small-scale gems that are always worth a visit, preferably around lunchtime for some cucina tipica in one the excellent local restaurants.

Turn off in the modern village on the main road to climb up to the old centro storico. The first thing you'll notice as the village comes into view are the copertelle, or covered walkways, built above the 12th century walls. You can stroll through them taking in the splendid views of the valley below.

Then search out the church of Santa Lucia, one of the region's prettiest high baroque churches built in 1650 on an older church. In amongst the gilt and the cherubs are remarkably fine paintings by Guido Reni, Pasqualino Rossi, and the Cavaliere D'Arpino. When you've finished take a coffee in the small opera-set piazza with a pretty fountain and a flag-draped town hall.

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